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Lake Argyle Cruise 3

New Year goalsetting part 2: Setting the goals

Another hotttttt day here in Kununurra.  I’m finding it fascinating how the people we’ve met here work their sleep around the heat of the rainy season.  The entire household is tucked up in bed by 8.30pm and up and at it by 6am at the latest – then everyone has a nap in the afternoon.  Yesterday morning we had hiked up Kelly’s Knob, showered and eaten breakfast all by 7.30am.

Kelly's Knob

Then in the afternoon we took a sunset cruise around Lake Argyle with about 15 friends.  It was just magical – it’s the largest manmade freshwater lake in Australia, is 22 times the size of Sydney Harbour and is 40 metres deep in one part.  It was one of those days that I was truly in awe of the beautiful world we get to live in.

Lake Arglye Cruises 1

Lake Argyle Cruises 2

Anyway, back onto the topic of goal-setting…

After doing the Wheel of Life exercise a couple of days ago, today I’ll be starting to get down to the nitty-gritty of articulating what my goals will be for the year – in between glugging down this stuff (just discovered it here, soooo good!).

Cocobella WM

Distracted again!!

The question I’ll be asking myself is: “What do I need to achieve in the immediate next 12 months to improve on those areas and get me closer to the ultimate vision I have for my life?”

My annual goal setting evolves year-on-year.  The first time I sat down and properly wrote my goals, it ran over two pages.  The problem was that it included goals but also habits – which are different things.

For example: “get super fit” is a goal, but “go to the gym four times a week” is a habit.  So the goal is what we want to achieve, but the habit is how we do it.  Having both goals and habits on there might work for you, so if so – go for your life!   I like my annual goals concise enough to squeeze onto one A4 sheet so I’m economical with what makes it on there.

I separate them into headings – Business, Personal Mission, Friends & Family, Wade, Travel, Wellbeing, Self-Development, Giving Back and Finance.

I then allocate specific, measurable goals to each of those headings in bullet points.  You will no doubt have read about S.M.A.R.T goals.  This approach states that goals must be Smart, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Timed.

I subscribe to S.M.A.R.T.E goals, which goes one step further and says that goals should also be Ecological – meaning they must be kind to you yourself, but also those around you and the planet.  There’s no point in setting a goal of tripling your business’s revenue if it means you’ll be a burnt-out shell of yourself by the end of the year and your partner hates your guts.

Here are some examples of goals you might set:

  • It’s the 1st of July and I’ve left my job to start my own business (this is a great one!!)
  • I will buy an investment property by the end of March
  • I will read ten books on business by the end of the year
  • I’ll increase the revenue of the business by 30% by May
  • I’ll be able to do a 50kg deadlift by my birthday
  • I’ll have two weekends away with my friends – one in March and one in November
  • I’ll visit three countries this year

An example of some of my goals for 2015 were:

  • Business – do a rebrand, recruit an assistant
  • Personal mission – write a book
  • Friends & family – see one Sydney friend a week
  • Finance – seek out tax advice
  • Self-development – do a fact-finding mission to the US
  • Wellbeing – do a one-week retreat
  • Wade – move to a bigger house together
  • Travel – trip to New Zealand with friends
  • Giving back – donate at least $10,000 to charity

My list of goals above from last year all have a deadline of the end of the year, however this year (2016) I’m going to break them down into quarterly plans and set a reward at the end of that quarter to give me an added incentive.  I’m thinking a bespoke handbag from Mon Purse for Q1…

If this goal-setting lark is all new to you, please don’t panic.  It can be really bloody difficult to predict 12 months out a goal that you can realistically achieve, but will also stretch you enough to make it worth doing.  You also don’t have a crystal ball that can predict the various hurdles, plot twists and changes of circumstances that might crop up while you’re earnestly out there trying to make magic happen.

However, a loose goal is better than no goal at all!

Do the best you can with the information you have to hand right now.  You can always modify the goal in time if you need to, but at least you’ve got a rough address in your GPS system that you’re working towards – you know what suburb you’re driving to, but maybe not the street just yet.  As time goes on, you’ll get a feel for what approach works for you and you’ll modify it to serve you best.  Just start somewhere!

I’m off to find a quiet corner with my notebook and pen… and another litre of coconut water.

Next up: New Year goal-setting part 3 – making goals a reality (AKA the weird things I do to keep myself accountable)

What do you think?

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